Mastering The Art Of Writing

Writing good books is a skill like any other. Its not something you are born with, not something that you will have a natural talent for. It is hard work, takes frequent practice, and is something you will have to improve on the rest of your life.
Few would-be writers grasp just how difficult writing is. Many assume that it is a natural talent that they just don’t have and, despite the idea that has been brewing in their minds for years, give up before they start. Others assume that it is pretty easy – with a little luck, a gifted editor, and a couple of months of work anyone can do it. Don’t make the mistake of treating writing as an impossible talent or a trivial pursuit. Pursue it, always continue to learn, and find criticism wherever you can and you will improve.

According to Robert Greene’s upcoming book, [amazon_link id=”0670024961″ target=”_blank” ]Mastery[/amazon_link], there are three steps that you must take in order to master anything:

Observation & Study. Before you become a writer, you must be a reader. Devour books that are in the genre you would like to write in. Read writing helps constantly. Pick up old dictionaries and books about odd words. Learn a new language, modern or ancient. Before you can even practice the art of writing, you have to create a foundation of great writers to build on.

Recommended Reading:

Any book in the genre you want to write in – read the best and build on them.

[amazon_link id=”1591280990″ target=”_blank” ]Wordsmithy[/amazon_link] – One of the best how-to books.

[amazon_link id=”0385480016″ target=”_blank” ]Bird By Bird[/amazon_link] – Great encouragement for writers.

[amazon_link id=”0688166369″ target=”_blank” ]Forgotten English[/amazon_link] – Develop your love for language.

[amazon_link id=”0307465357″ target=”_blank” ]The 4-Hour Workweek[/amazon_link] – Great read & one of the best organized books available.


Practice & Critique.
In the second phase of mastering writing, you will need to put what you have learned into practice. Start writing daily. Work on your editing skills. Improve your sentence structure and develop your own voice. Buy workbooks and writing guides and work on your prose. Write outside of your genre and stretch yourself. Try to get smaller pieces published in newspapers, magazines, and blogs. Seek out experienced critics and insist that they find things wrong with your work.

Recommended Reading:

[amazon_link id=”0060937238″ target=”_blank” ]Simple & Direct[/amazon_link]

[amazon_link id=”0205313426″ target=”_blank” ]The Elements of Style[/amazon_link]

[amazon_link id=”0060891548″ target=”_blank” ]On Writing Well[/amazon_link]

[amazon_link id=”1440542740″ target=”_blank” ]The Plot Whisperer Workbook[/amazon_link]

[amazon_link id=”B001O222C2″ target=”_blank” ]Spunk & Bite[/amazon_link]

 

Writing For Publication. After observing and practicing the art of writing, you should start to write your own work for publication. Because of the groundwork you have already done, you will be able to focus on delivering great content rather than working on your technique as you go. Focus on developing something that is unique compared to other books in the genre, but that will also connect with those who love the best titles that are there. Continue to seek out criticism, but also trust your own writing voice at this stage. After you have put in the hard work, its best to trust your instincts at this stage.

Recommended Reading:

Mind Map Post – Learn how to use mind maps to outline your book

Top Ten Writing Tips From Accomplished Authors

Books on Mastery Coming Soon:  [amazon_link id=”0670024961″ target=”_blank” ]Mastery[/amazon_link] by Robert Greene, [amazon_link id=”0547884591″ target=”_blank” ]The 4-Hour Chef[/amazon_link] by Tim Ferris, & a new book coming from Josh Kaufman next year.